Water Wise

When it rains, Los Angeles sends billions of gallons of 'free liquid gold' down the drain

 
During one of this winter’s frequent storms, sheets of rainwater spilled from roofs, washed across sidewalks and down gutters into a sprawling network of underground storm drains that empty into the Los Angeles River channel. (Same goes for Ballona Flood Control Channel. Billions of gallons of rainwater
flow into the Pacific Ocean at Santa Monica Bay.)

You can reduce your water bill by capturing "free" rainwater.
 
Private homes cover 60% of our developed LA land mass. 

89% of our water comes from hundreds of miles away. 
Do your part. Capture "free" rainwater on site. 
Adapt simple methods described here. 
Plants and trees will thrive.
 
TREES TAKE CARE OF EACH, THEY SHARE WITH EACH OTHER, THEY STORE WATER IN THEIR ROOT SYSTEMS
 
Rain Water Capture and Reuse discussion by Jeanette Vosburg at the Culver City Garden Club  9.2.15. Capturing rainwater has saved 40% on the water bill from 2014 and 2015. Jeanette suggests choosing one or two of her ideas on your own property. 41 Minutes

Action Item For A Homeowner: If you own a home or unimproved land, consider capturing water on site. Exploring Rainwater Capture Options.pdf
Action Item For Activitist: 100+WAYS TO CONSERVE
 
VIDEOS
Implications of Ballona Wetlands Restoration - Travis Longcore

Water Wise Related Material

YouTube: How To Use A Catchment Basin To Eliminate Ponding And To Save Precious Rain Water on an Industrial Property.

https://youtu.be/kLVqSvcv8eA

During heavy rains, our industrial parking lot would have six inch puddles. Our cement contractor, De Olivera Concrete removed approximately 1,000 feet of concrete, dug a 8 by 8 by 8 foot deep Catchment Basin, filled it with gravel, and installed a steel grate so rainwater could percolate back into the earth. This win, win situation helped the tenant and put much need rainwater back into our aquifer. 
 

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