Water Wise

When it rains, Los Angeles sends billions of gallons of 'free liquid gold' down the drain

During one of this winter’s frequent storms, sheets of rainwater spilled from roofs, washed across sidewalks and down gutters into a sprawling network of underground storm drains that empty into the Los Angeles River channel. (Same goes for Ballona Flood Control Channel. Billions of gallons of rainwater
flow into the Pacific Ocean at Santa Monica Bay.)

You can reduce your water bill by capturing "free" rainwater.
 
Private homes cover 60% of our developed LA land mass. 

89% of our water comes from hundreds of miles away. 
Do your part. Capture "free" rainwater on site. 
Adapt simple methods described here. 
Plants and trees will thrive.
 
TREES TAKE CARE OF EACH, THEY SHARE WITH EACH OTHER, THEY STORE WATER IN THEIR ROOT SYSTEMS
 
Rain Water Capture and Reuse discussion by Jeanette Vosburg at the Culver City Garden Club  9.2.15. Capturing rainwater has saved 40% on the water bill from 2014 and 2015. Jeanette suggests choosing one or two of her ideas on your own property. 41 Minutes

Action Item For A Homeowner: If you own a home or unimproved land, consider capturing water on site. Exploring Rainwater Capture Options.pdf
Action Item For Activitist: 100+WAYS TO CONSERVE
 
VIDEOS
Implications of Ballona Wetlands Restoration - Travis Longcore

Water Wise Related Material

Underground Greenhouse for Food Year Round

The underground greenhouse, has no expensive clear sides (plastic or glass), a cheap plastic sheet roof to let in more light than glass, and heat loss through walls to the air, which can be colder than the ground (57 degrees Farenheit or so), so it will be cheaper to build and run. 

Of course, it's a lot of digging, and the left over dirt must go somewhere.  Hint: Save the top 10 inches of top soil when starting to dig for use in the greenhouse.

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